When you look at dog bite statistics, it becomes clear that the risk to children is high. There are a lot of factors in play. Children tend to be smaller, shorter and less strong than adults, so they can’t avoid a dog or fend it off. They also may not see the warning signs that adults see before a bite. 

These bites are also more likely to be serious. For instance, they often impact the neck and head of children, simply because of their size. An adult may also get bitten, but it may be to an extremity. The location of the bite has a lot to do with the outcome and the odds of the injury being fatal. 

One thing to consider is that a child that has a dog at home may actually be more likely to get bitten by a dog outside of the house. That familiarity doesn’t necessarily make them safer. 

For instance, you may have a sweet, friendly dog at home. It has been around your children since birth. They feel incredibly comfortable and you know the dog would never hurt them. 

When they meet another dog, though, the children may just assume that it is the same as their own beloved pet. This is why kids often excitedly run up to pet any dog they see. If that dog is actually aggressive and feels threatened by the fast-approaching child, it could be more likely to bite them during the encounter. If you are a parent whose child has been injured in such an incident, make sure you are well aware of all of the legal options you have. Your child deserves compensation for their pain, their emotional distress and all of their medical expenses.